Jump to content

Where/how do I find eggs?


Pamela Wild
 Share

Recommended Posts

They drop them on the ground.

But since they despawn eventually, and the chickens move around besides, it's very difficult to find them in the wild. If you need a steady supply for some reason, build a pen with one side open, chase some chickens so that they run into the pen, and then close it up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/20/2021 at 9:13 PM, Streetwind said:

 If you need a steady supply for some reason, build a pen with one side open, chase some chickens so that they run into the pen, and then close it up.

I generally dig a moat (height=2 of course) at the location I want to settle poultry. This moat is a long ditch, making a line. Then I manage to chase a rooster, this is the difficult part of the process, because I have to stand constantly "behind" the rooster, so it can flee heading the ditch. Once it has fallen in the ditch (with hens, preferably), I narrow the length of this ditch, build a fence around, and allow the  poultry to exit before filling it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I do for capturing chickens is easier (and also looks nicer 😌) - fence a pen area (5x5 is a decent size) in flat land and place a small trough in the center, then fill it with grain, and then connect dirt blocks to the outer side of the fences - this creates a one-block tall dirt 'ramp' that lets the animals get into the pen, but not out. Then you just need to chase the chickens towards the general vicinity of the pen and they'll do the rest themselves once they notice the full trough (you'll need to keep your distance once you get them near the pen so that you scaring them doesn't interrupt their going for your bait). You should remove the access dirt ramp as soon as you get your chickens (one hen and one rooster) in, to avoid predators getting in at night. Snow buildup during winter can also allow animals to go over fences, so prepare accordingly if it snows in your area. You can also fence-in pigs and longhorns this way, but since you can't scare them, you should build the pens right next to where the wild animals are, and you can scoot the fenced area closer to you little by little after that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, ahueonao said:

What I do for capturing chickens is easier (and also looks nicer 😌) - fence a pen area (5x5 is a decent size) in flat land and place a small trough in the center, then fill it with grain, and then connect dirt blocks to the outer side of the fences - this creates a one-block tall dirt 'ramp' that lets the animals get into the pen, but not out. Then you just need to chase the chickens towards the general vicinity of the pen and they'll do the rest themselves once they notice the full trough (you'll need to keep your distance once you get them near the pen so that you scaring them doesn't interrupt their going for your bait). You should remove the access dirt ramp as soon as you get your chickens (one hen and one rooster) in, to avoid predators getting in at night. Snow buildup during winter can also allow animals to go over fences, so prepare accordingly if it snows in your area. You can also fence-in pigs and longhorns this way, but since you can't scare them, you should build the pens right next to where the wild animals are, and you can scoot the fenced area closer to you little by little after that.

This sounds much easier than chasing chickens all over hell and back!!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, ahueonao said:

You can also fence-in pigs and longhorns this way, but since you can't scare them, you should build the pens right next to where the wild animals are, and you can scoot the fenced area closer to you little by little after that.

Alternately, you can build a goat pen leave one end unfenced, an open gate on the opposite end and if possible a feed trough w/ food.  Pitch a rock at local nearby male goat and run like the dickens.  Male and nearby ewes will chase you down quiet a long distance.  Run through the open end, through the gate and close the gate.  Wait for the goats to calm down and then finish their pen.  The open end needs to be at least 2 fence sections wide, but I've had goats get hung up trying to navigate through the opening.  I'd recommend four section wide gap.

 

This might work for pigs (I haven't tried it yet, lack of local pigs) but watching utubers pigs may run away when struck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.