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  1. It is a relatively shared issue/opinion that berries are too strong. They are one of the easiest to obtain and lowest-maintenance food sources in-game, and are very easy to collect in mass quantities until the player effectively needs no other food sources outside of winter (given you're not surviving in extreme climates). Though, there are a matter of "false" solutions to the problem: - Nerfing saturation threatens more problems than it solves. Berries are already one of the lowest time:saturation ratio growables, and lowering them further would make them tedious to eat and require more berry gathering (which is tedious on its own) for the same satiety. - Increasing natural bush rarity, making bushes harder to translocate, decreasing berry harvest size, or increasing length between harvests doesn't solve the issue, it just increases the labor it takes players to reach the aforementioned tipping point where they need no other foods. Players can still collect berries in mass to reach this status, and the problem persists--you just have to eat more of them for the same satiety, which adds tedium. Both of these changes add tedium to the berry-usage process (and makes them generally less useful), which can threaten the abandonment of berry usage as a whole. Though, making all of these changes but in small amounts may avoid more glaring consequences while still maintaining a nerf to overall usefulness, but it is a patch over the wound at most--not a full fix. The problem lies with how berries are obtained and cultivated--they are far too easy to collect and plant in obscene quantities. The solution relies on changing how berry planting functions with minor tweaks elsewhere to complement such changes, but nothing severe enough to discourage berry use altogether. A few example solutions: - Berry bushes must be planted in tilled soil like crops, and consume nutrients. A rather unelegant solution, this poses problems: they may have to be removed to regenerate soil nutrients, they don't naturally grow/function like soil crops (no growth stages, seeds, etc.), they'd now need water for the soil, etc. On the other hand, berries would now be limited (like other crops) by soil quality and quantity, access to water, nutrient regeneration/crop-cycling, etc. which begins to solve the prolific-propagation problem. - Give berries alternative, useful uses. Encouraging players to use berries for uses other than eating will simply reduce the amount of berries used for satiation. Things like brewing alcohol (which can be drunk or traded for non-satiety benefits) or baiting wild animals (have them eat stray berries on the ground) provide alternative use that creates more content or solves other existing problems, respectively. One could also make berries significantly more useful for generating rot/compost than other options (which helps solve the problem that compost takes so much rot it is not worth actively pursuing... it takes 1 stack of rot for 1 compost and 8 stacks of rot for one high-fertility soil block). The main issue with this is that it is a pseudo-solution: players do not have to actually pursue/utilize these alternative uses. The reason I mention "minor tweaks elsewhere to complement such changes" is that, with proper tweaking, one can create the most solutions while preventing the most problems. I personally think that a combination of a slight all-around nerf to raw berries as food plus enough alternative uses would slightly discourage their usefulness (and commensurately use) as food while greatly encouraging using berries for other purposes. This would not only create more content and depth to berries in the process (a positive change), it would largely avoid the negative repercussions that may come with major numbers nerfs. There are definitely more potential solutions I have not thought of, but I think it is safe to say that berries need some form of tweaking in order to balance them.
  2. Had a thought for how to transplant and grow mushrooms while keeping the realistic theme of vintage story. We simply craft a mycelium block. Take a base material of strewn hay, compost, or cobb, and combine it with 5 or so mushrooms of the same type. This makes a mycelium block. Then you plant said block in a shaded/ dark spot to start growing.
  3. I saw a couple of posts touching at it, but nothing more general than flowers die back, so here's a more general one. I want. To suffer. ... apparently. Skip to the bottom for a bullet list of "Liked" and "Want" My spouse and I were discussing our surprise at the way a harsh winter turned out. I can understand if it makes it too difficult to play for the standard setting (don't want to scare off new users) but I'd like to have winter be even more punishing without switching over to the seriously-don't-die mode, because that's more about unlucky reincarnation and scary monsters than dealing with a Napoleonic winter. A sort of "do your ancestors proud" setting that really kicks you when you're down if you weren't fully prepared. I enjoy the standard difficulty settings, but I struggled to settle in for a devastating cold season that was only mildly inconvenient. I'm glad to see fewer animals, and they have less meat or fat, sometimes none at all, but the plants were unexpected - once fall came, I had hurriedly stocked up on horsetail and reeds (I intended to explore caves and needed poultices handy) and gathered a couple stacks of hay bales so I could breed animals all winter and/or keep them fat enough to be tasty. But the grass grew back, the horsetail stood out like a red flag, and perhaps the most convenient but not immersive, any and all wild crops were fluorescent green against a snowy backdrop. I could climb a mountain and pick out every tasty or seed-bearing target within my very long line of sight. Berries falling off in the snow was a nice touch (I've definitely found mid-winter or last-year berries on bushes and eaten them IRL, but it's super rare), but I wanted more than that. Here's some of what we considered, liked, and wanted. I understand that animal husbandry has a lot on the menu already, so I'm not touching that at all in here. I look forward to others' suggestions! As an aside, the first time I started shivering, I thought it was an earthquake XD Classic human-imposter mistake. Glad no one was around to see my telltale blunder. Liked: *Trees didn't regrow, just got ready. *Snowed-on bushes lost berries (I did find a single bush under a pine tree that had fresh fruit) *Devastating cold (I look forward to clothing crafting lol) *Animals became more scarce and leaner *Snow piling up meant animals (or drifters) could jump fences *If I forgot to light a fire, I froze my butt off while sleeping *Oil lamps appear to keep snow a little bit at bay Wanted: *If skeps are either unprotected or without a full store of honey, bees die (I brought one in side just in case) *Immature wild crops die, or die back to their smallest form to start again next spring *Flowers die/hide *Any short grass the gets snowed on gets buried/destroyed, no grass grows. *Tilled, uncovered ground becomes untilled. Perhaps you could put hay bales across the dirt to protect it/crops? *Snow packing/building. Maybe right click with a shovel to compress or toss more onto your in-progress block? *Dirt gets hard - the top two or three layers of dirt should take double or triple time (and durability?) to dig up once it's below freezing. *I may have just not noticed if snow wets you, but once there's access to clothing, non-oiled clothes should slowly get damp and then soaking in snow. *Food preservation dramatically increased near the cold/snow *Using a saw, collect ice to pile up for later in the year, re: previous food preservation. Underground, in a cave, under a linen tarp all work. Packed snow and piled ice can last until August. *Hot potatoes: heat up a brick (not too much) in a fire and carry it with you. In your pocket, very slight warmth, in your active or off hand grants much more heat at the cost of a free hand. *Naked trees - leaves disappear, branchy leaves replaced by plain branches, trees drop seedlings much less often in winter and spring, much more often in summer and fall. *Hot food, like fresh or reheated on a fire, should boost and/or maintain your body temp. *High activity, like running, chopping wood, shoveling snow or dirt, should keep you warm in most conditions, but at a significant cost to your satiation. A couple parting thoughts - these things will mostly make the game harder (hot potatoes and food preservation notwithstanding) but there will also be other benefits to some of that. Were all the vegetation to die back, sure it'd be rough on me, but if I had food and firewood stocked (I did, in this first case) then I'd spend the winter planning, preparing, and prospecting. Caves and ruins would become more hazardous, but also easier to find, either for a risky expedition or to revisit in the warmer months if you can find them again. It would be easier to find surface deposits after vegetaion but before snow, or in a lull. Finding an animal, or a mature plant you had missed, would be immensely more rewarding. Warming by the fire on a long winter trek is good, but eating some toasty wolf steak will stick with you longer. The lessons learned the first time around, about leaving food for your bees or collecting ample firewood, would significantly reshape your second-winter preparations, and I think would further endear anyone who managed to stick it out Hit me with your ideas.
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