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Earthworms, Animal feces, Manure, Vermicomposting and Mushroom cultivation


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This post actually consists of several suggestions and not a only one suggestion, so I would like to ask the reader to evaluate each element separately if possible, although some elements are interconnected.

I will explain what the suggestion/suggestions are about, separating each explanation into sections:

 

Earthworms:
A new entity that will come out of soils with medium or rich fertility when it rains or through the use of a special wooden tool called the "worm stick." Worms can be caught by hand and added to jars. They can be used as human food, for some animals, as fishing bait, or for a special and fast type of composting called "vermicomposting."
 

Worm stick:
The worm stick is used to "call" earthworms to the surface through vibrations created by driving the stick into the ground and rubbing it. This method is known as vermiculation. It is an ancient technique that has been used for centuries, especially for fishing.

 

Animal feces:

Animals will produce feces of several types (by the animal type). These will remain on the ground and can be identified by the player. They do not need to be very specific. They could have several categories for identification: "small predator feces," "large predator feces," "small herbivore feces," "ruminant feces," "slurry," and "bird feces".

Each type of feces has different qualities. "Bird feces" are very rich in nitrogen. "Ruminant feces" can be used to make high-quality manure. "Slurries" are very rich in phosphorus but also saline and almost liquid in consistency. Predator feces indicate the presence of predators, some of which can be very dangerous to the player (large predators = bears), so it is good to know they are nearby.

Initially, all types of feces (except predator ones) can be used to make manure, but ruminant feces are the best, of the highest quality, and the easiest to handle for this purpose. Feces of any type can also be used in classic composting, along with rotting and other food scraps.

Predator feces can't be used for manure, but can be used for traditional composting.

 

Manure:

Applying feces directly to crops can increase soil salinity and the incidence of crop diseases. If salinity is high, it will burn the crops and ruin the harvest.

However, you can mix grass, wheat, or dried herbs and soil with feces to make immature manure that over time, when placed in a pile or pit, will mature into something more stable and of better quality, with more assimilable nutrients, lower salinity, and lower risk of disease incidence.

 

Vermicomposting and two types of rot:

Vermicomposting is a process that uses plant residues (fresh or rotten, it doesn't matter), soil, and high-cellulose remnants (dry grass, wood, etc.) together with worms to quickly make a high-quality fertilizer in a few days or weeks (faster than classic composting). The process requires special tiered composters and can produce a surplus of worms from a few base worms, which can be used for human food, livestock, aquaculture, and fishing. However, there is a drawback to vermicomposting: you must not use animal scraps, animal rot nor feces.

Classic composting is a slow process that can use rot of any type of food to make high-quality fertilizer. For do vermicomposting possible, it is time to distinguish between different types of rot: animal and vegetable rot. Vegetable rot is safer and does not pose a risk of transmitting diseases to humans. Animal rot has a risk of transmitting diseases to humans. Fortunately, classic composting can reach very high temperatures that kill pathogens present in animal rot and animal scraps. Feces have similar risks.

In vermicomposting, however, you can only use vegetable residues and vegetale rot, as the process does not reach adequate temperatures to kill pathogens from meat and feces. Additionally, meat rot and feces can directly or indirectly harm worms (diseases, excess nitrogen and phosphorus, salinity, etc.) and reduce the quality of the resulting vermicompost.

 

Mushroom cultivation:

I find this last suggestion particularly interesting. We can categorize four types of mushrooms by their ease and requirements for cultivation:

    1. not (yet) cultivable (they are symbiotic, and require root mycorrhization, very specific cultivation environments and other advanced techniques that are not implementable in the game right now, e.g. truffles).
    1. cultivable on wood (can be grown on wood: make holes in a log, add spores and seal the hole (certain advanced hygiene and sterilization techniques will improve success and production rates); e.g., shiitake).
    1. cultivable on manure (easy to grow in mature manure, very rich soil, and compost; no special mycorrhization techniques are required, just add spores (although certain advanced hygiene and sterilization techniques will improve success and production rates); e.g., mushrooms).
    1. cultivable on grain (mushroom cakes) (easy to grow in a mixture of boiled grains with soil or straw; no special mycorrhization techniques are required, just add spores (although certain advanced hygiene and sterilization techniques will improve success and production rates); e.g., oyster mushrooms).

The mushroom cultivation process varies according to the type of cultivation. For wood and manure cultivation, you only need to inoculate the material and wait for mushrooms to sprout under suitable temperature and humidity conditions.

 

Spore prints:

Spores can be extracted using paper or papyrus and a mushroom. This will leave a powder of spores on the surface of the paper. This is called a spore print.


Mushroom cakes:
For grain or "cake" cultivation, you must first grow the mycelium on the grain/straw within a container. Once the mycelium has colonized the substrate, it is mixed with medium or rich fertility soil to allow mushrooms to sprout. After harvesting mushrooms, they will sprout again after a while, up to three times. The spent mushroom cake (where you cultivated this third type of mushroom) can be used as an ingredient in composting.

 

Not suggested:

Human feces:

This implementation may not add fun to the game, so I do not personally suggest it. Although it is true that having to defecate and requiring sanitation structures would add more realism and complexity to the game. If added, human feces can be used in traditional composting, but not for manure.

Edited by Doctor Antiquarium
correction
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5 hours ago, Doctor Antiquarium said:

This post actually consists of several suggestions and not a only one suggestion, so I would like to ask the reader to evaluate each element separately if possible, although some elements are interconnected.

I will explain what the suggestion/suggestions are about, separating each explanation into sections:

 

Earthworms:
A new entity that will come out of soils with medium or rich fertility when it rains or through the use of a special wooden tool called the "worm stick." Worms can be caught by hand and added to jars. They can be used as human food, for some animals, as fishing bait, or for a special and fast type of composting called "vermicomposting."
 

Worm stick:
The worm stick is used to "call" earthworms to the surface through vibrations created by driving the stick into the ground and rubbing it. This method is known as vermiculation. It is an ancient technique that has been used for centuries, especially for fishing.

 

Animal feces:

Animals will produce feces of several types (by the animal type). These will remain on the ground and can be identified by the player. They do not need to be very specific. They could have several categories for identification: "small predator feces," "large predator feces," "small herbivore feces," "ruminant feces," "slurry," and "bird feces".

Each type of feces has different qualities. "Bird feces" are very rich in nitrogen. "Ruminant feces" can be used to make high-quality manure. "Slurries" are very rich in phosphorus but also saline and almost liquid in consistency. Predator feces indicate the presence of predators, some of which can be very dangerous to the player (large predators = bears), so it is good to know they are nearby.

Initially, all types of feces (except predator ones) can be used to make manure, but ruminant feces are the best, of the highest quality, and the easiest to handle for this purpose. Feces of any type can also be used in classic composting, along with rotting and other food scraps.

Predator feces can't be used for manure, but can be used for traditional composting.

 

Manure:

Applying feces directly to crops can increase soil salinity and the incidence of crop diseases. If salinity is high, it will burn the crops and ruin the harvest.

However, you can mix grass, wheat, or dried herbs and soil with feces to make immature manure that over time, when placed in a pile or pit, will mature into something more stable and of better quality, with more assimilable nutrients, lower salinity, and lower risk of disease incidence.

 

Vermicomposting and two types of rot:

Vermicomposting is a process that uses plant residues (fresh or rotten, it doesn't matter), soil, and high-cellulose remnants (dry grass, wood, etc.) together with worms to quickly make a high-quality fertilizer in a few days or weeks (faster than classic composting). The process requires special tiered composters and can produce a surplus of worms from a few base worms, which can be used for human food, livestock, aquaculture, and fishing. However, there is a drawback to vermicomposting: you must not use animal scraps, animal rot nor feces.

Classic composting is a slow process that can use rot of any type of food to make high-quality fertilizer. For do vermicomposting possible, it is time to distinguish between different types of rot: animal and vegetable rot. Vegetable rot is safer and does not pose a risk of transmitting diseases to humans. Animal rot has a risk of transmitting diseases to humans. Fortunately, classic composting can reach very high temperatures that kill pathogens present in animal rot and animal scraps. Feces have similar risks.

In vermicomposting, however, you can only use vegetable residues and vegetale rot, as the process does not reach adequate temperatures to kill pathogens from meat and feces. Additionally, meat rot and feces can directly or indirectly harm worms (diseases, excess nitrogen and phosphorus, salinity, etc.) and reduce the quality of the resulting vermicompost.

 

Mushroom cultivation:

I find this last suggestion particularly interesting. We can categorize four types of mushrooms by their ease and requirements for cultivation:

    1. not (yet) cultivable (they are symbiotic, and require root mycorrhization, very specific cultivation environments and other advanced techniques that are not implementable in the game right now, e.g. truffles).
    1. cultivable on wood (can be grown on wood: make holes in a log, add spores and seal the hole (certain advanced hygiene and sterilization techniques will improve success and production rates); e.g., shiitake).
    1. cultivable on manure (easy to grow in mature manure, very rich soil, and compost; no special mycorrhization techniques are required, just add spores (although certain advanced hygiene and sterilization techniques will improve success and production rates); e.g., mushrooms).
    1. cultivable on grain (mushroom cakes) (easy to grow in a mixture of boiled grains with soil or straw; no special mycorrhization techniques are required, just add spores (although certain advanced hygiene and sterilization techniques will improve success and production rates); e.g., oyster mushrooms).

The mushroom cultivation process varies according to the type of cultivation. For wood and manure cultivation, you only need to inoculate the material and wait for mushrooms to sprout under suitable temperature and humidity conditions.

 

Spore prints:

Spores can be extracted using paper or papyrus and a mushroom. This will leave a powder of spores on the surface of the paper. This is called a spore print.


Mushroom cakes:
For grain or "cake" cultivation, you must first grow the mycelium on the grain/straw within a container. Once the mycelium has colonized the substrate, it is mixed with medium or rich fertility soil to allow mushrooms to sprout. After harvesting mushrooms, they will sprout again after a while, up to three times. The spent mushroom cake (where you cultivated this third type of mushroom) can be used as an ingredient in composting.

 

Not suggested:

Human feces:

This implementation may not add fun to the game, so I do not personally suggest it. Although it is true that having to defecate and requiring sanitation structures would add more realism and complexity to the game. If added, human feces can be used in traditional composting, but not for manure.

Earthworm & earthworm stick is presented in very good shape as a mechanics in Primitive Survival. There is also earthowrm castings mechanic. Cultivation of mushrooms is good in Wild Farming - Revival.

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5 hours ago, Dilan Rona said:

I do think it would be better if Vintage Story had it included as part of Vanilla

Sure, ideally VS would have every feature, and you just choose which you want to use. The question is which features are priorities.

I'd place these as lower priority simply because there are alternatives already implemented in-game. Mushrooms are inferior to farmable sources of vegetable nutrition. And we already have compost, which is not only slower than what is being proposed, it's also slower than real life. IRL, you can make a batch of compost in about 2/3 of a month, as opposed to the 3-ish months in game. I'm guessing the slower process in the game was a design choice, probably to incentivize exploration for better soil.

[EDIT]

I like the idea. Don't love it, or I would play more modded than I do. It's just not as big a wish as other things, like the rideable animals they are releasing in 1.20/

[/EDIT]

Edited by Thorfinn
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