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ApacheTech

Vintarian
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ApacheTech last won the day on April 2

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About ApacheTech

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  1. Update The axles were located directly on a chunk border, and the windmill itself straddled two chunks as well. So, I moved the entire building, and rebuilt the entire line, end-to-end. And now this... At the chunk border, the axle itself stops, part way down the line. In the image, the left side is stopped, while the right side rotates. The left side is the chunk in which I log into, and where my spawn point is set. If I sleep, even momentarily, even within that chunk, then everything synchronises again, and it works.
  2. Why? Lava makes for brilliant ambient lighting. I'd love to be able to build with lava.
  3. Soon, I hope. 14 hours per day is waaaaayyy too much.
  4. I love this! I've been playing around with some pieces, but this looks amazing! I made a Draughts board, and an Omok board that uses the same pieces.
  5. Detailing a bug within Vintage Story, regarding Wooden Axles and Angled Gears. When logging into a server, if the angled gears are on a chunk border, the subsequent line of wooden angles will fail to connect.
  6. What is the secondary mode? Is it explained, in-game, how to enable it, and how to use it?
  7. That would work if it were only stairs that were the problem. But, even walking up or down a single voxel causes terrible jittering. If you chisel a block to be a one voxel rise per step, no matter how deep the tread is, you'll still get that nauseating stutter. A lot of the jump mechanics need an overhaul as well; things like stack-jumping are much harder than they should be; jumping out of water is atrocious, and sometimes physically impossible; catching a block mid jump causes you to fall backwards and sink into the block below, which means travelling around hilly terrain can be a real pain. The simplest way to fix the elevation change jitter is to ignore animations when the elevation change is below 0.51 blocks. Anything that doesn't stop movement is classed as the same elevation when moving between blocks.
  8. Nah. It's the same width as a horse would be. It's smaller than a horse would be. It's lighter than a horse would be. Even if it means the horse walking on a bridle-path next to the track, it'd be easy enough. But, with the wheels on that thing, it'd work without a railtrack as well. Toughest thing would be elevation changes.
  9. Horses would be the obvious first step, and would make an absolute world of difference within the game. Really hoping they come out soon, the game really needs them. This kind of small, one-block cart would be best pushed by hand, or pulled by a horse. Locomotives would be larger, multi-block models capable of pulling a lot more than these. This is a good early mid-game cart though.
  10. Multiple other voxel and block based games manage this with no problem. Also, chiselling makes the effect even worse.
  11. You can find decorative bookcases in ruins, or buy them from traders, but functional bookcases that act as chests for books would be good. Expanding on this idea, you could easily include: Quill Ink Lectern to display written books for easy reading.
  12. Chiselling blocks to be 4, 2, or even 1 voxel high staircases also causes horrendous and nauseating jittering. It would be good if the animation only kicked in at 0.51 block height difference between the current step and the next step. Below that threshold, the animation and "jump" routines don't happen, so it causes a smooth transition between steps if walking between slabs/stairs/chiselled blocks.
  13. Sound Effects Bug: When stood in the third story of a full enclosed building, over 20 blocks above ground level, the noise from the drifters spawning in the caves 30+ blocks below the building is still plainly audible, and as loud as it would be if the Drifters were in the same room. This causes an incessant white-noise when playing which is nigh-on impossible to get away from while in the vicinity of the build. I believe this to be a bug, or at the least, an oversight. There is currently no efficient way to light up caves, or surrounding area to stop the spawning, so means even during daytime hours, drifters still spawn, and are insanely loud, considering they are over 50 blocks away, in a sealed cave, through multiple layers of rock, gravel, grass, and wood. I shouldn't be able to hear them at all. Steps to reproduce: 1. Find an underground cave. 2. Light up the surrounding surface area (in my case, a building), to dissuade spawning in the immediate area. 3. Stay in the area through a few day cycles. Expected Results: • Groaning during the night from surface drifters that spawn and wander into the lit up area, but then leave in the morning. • Other than that, silence. Actual results: • Groaning during the night from surface drifters that spawn and wander into the lit up area, but then leave in the morning. • Loud, incessant, relentless groaning from the caves below ground. Potential Fixes: • When in an enclosed area, such as a building, with the doors closed, drifter noises from outside should be muted. • Drifters within underground caves should be muted when players are on the surface above. Preferred Additional Fix to the wider problem: • Include an ability to adjust/mute the volume of hostile mobs within the Sound Options of the game (bringing in the option to adjust/mute passive mobs, neutral mobs, weather, echo chambers, and block interaction sfx). Why this is a bug/oversight: • There is currently no possible way to get away from the constant white-noise of these drifters. It's insufferable, and destroys the playability of the game. There is no way that the sound should penetrate through the ground like this, and there is no way to stop it short of overwriting the drifter sound effect files of the game with silent OGG files.
  14. I supply a multiplayer server full of builders with all the different wood types.
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