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My animals don't breed


Skru
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I captured about 10 sheep (7 female, 3 male), 8 pigs (6 female, 2 male) and a hen and a rooster ingame between May to June (1 month = 12 days). I fed them until all female sheep had saturation 10 and the sows had saturation level 8. It took me until August until I had enough food. Since then they are all fed and ready to breed. Currently it is end of November, but they don't get pregnant. In the same time I fed my hen, which got pregnant and the first generation of chicken is already grown up by now.

I wonder what I am doing wrong. In another world (in version 1.12.14) I kept male and female sheep and pig separated by a fence and they still got pregnant. In the current world (version 1.13.4) I tried the same, but none of the animals got pregnant. I released at least one male a while ago into the herd of females, but still nothing happens.

My pigs are currently in an underground cellar. My sheep and chickens are in two block deep pits because they glitched out of the fence sometimes.

What are the breeding conditions for animals? Do they need sunlight? Do they need physical contact between males and females? May I keep them separated? Do they only get pregnant in certain seasons? Do I have to keep them above sea level? Do the males also need food (I saw them eat, but they don't get any saturation)?

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9 hours ago, Skru said:

My sheep and chickens are in two block deep pits because they glitched out of the fence sometimes.

I'm seeing this too. I keep finding my sheep in the pits surrounding the fenced enclosure. It happened once with the chickens too.

It seemed to start happening in winter, and I assumed the snow on the ground was making it so they could climb over the fences so I've made the fences 2 blocks high for both.

For the sheep I've left a 1 wide gap where it is only 1 high so I can fill the trough, and each corner is only 1 block high because it has an oil lamp on it at the moment. Sheep need a 2 wide space to get through as far as I can see.

It will be interesting to see if they keep getting through the fence, or if the problem goes away when the now melts.

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I made some experiments today. Here are my results in case anyone should encounter similar problems with breeding. I only tested the breeding conditions for sheep, but I guess the same mechanism applies to chicken and pigs.

  • Sea level is not relevant. They can reproduce at any height (I tested height 60 to height 150)
  • Sunlight is not necessary. They can reproduce without any light. Nevertheless, they need a light level of at least 10 to live. Artificial light sources are sufficient.
  • Males and females don't need physical contact. They may be separated by fences or walls and may be kept in different rooms or fields.
  • The seasons don't seem to influence the breeding. They can also breed in December at -5°C (my testing area didn't become very cold in winter).
  • The female animal must be ready to mate and (in case of sheep) have a saturation level of 10.
  • There must be a male sheep in at most 10 blocks distance (circular radius, not cubic).
  • The male sheep must eat at least one portion of feed to be "activated" to breed. Even if all the females have full saturation, they will not become pregnant until the male has eaten one portion. As far as I observed, one male that ate one portion is enough to breed forever, even for future pregnancies (I tested about a year by adding time and increasing the time speed).
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  • 4 weeks later...
On 10/10/2020 at 1:47 PM, Skru said:

I made some experiments today. Here are my results in case anyone should encounter similar problems with breeding. I only tested the breeding conditions for sheep, but I guess the same mechanism applies to chicken and pigs.

  • Sea level is not relevant. They can reproduce at any height (I tested height 60 to height 150)
  • Sunlight is not necessary. They can reproduce without any light. Nevertheless, they need a light level of at least 10 to live. Artificial light sources are sufficient.
  • Males and females don't need physical contact. They may be separated by fences or walls and may be kept in different rooms or fields.
  • The seasons don't seem to influence the breeding. They can also breed in December at -5°C (my testing area didn't become very cold in winter).
  • The female animal must be ready to mate and (in case of sheep) have a saturation level of 10.
  • There must be a male sheep in at most 10 blocks distance (circular radius, not cubic).
  • The male sheep must eat at least one portion of feed to be "activated" to breed. Even if all the females have full saturation, they will not become pregnant until the male has eaten one portion. As far as I observed, one male that ate one portion is enough to breed forever, even for future pregnancies (I tested about a year by adding time and increasing the time speed).

I have a sheep, a ram, and a pig in a pin. the pig is gaining saturation, but the ewe and the ram are not. Is this a bug, or do they need something other than flax grain?

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/9/2020 at 6:51 PM, David Taylor said:

I assumed the snow on the ground was making it so they could climb over the fences

this is correct. if you get sufficient snow fall it will raise the ground high enough for them to just walk over fences. that being said though. my pigs escape the pens they are in even when there is no snow fall. I figure this is due to over crowding as they are already full grown gen 5 pigs and I have well over 30 pigs in the pen, I put a second row of fencing around the original pen with a 1 block space and a few fence post occasionally to help find out where they are getting out. most of the time it's around the fence gate that they get past even when it is closed all the time. also having your feeding trough too close to the fence will also allow them to walk out.

 

On 11/3/2020 at 11:46 PM, AngryRob said:

Sunlight is not necessary. They can reproduce without any light. Nevertheless, they need a light level of at least 10 to live. Artificial light sources are sufficient.

I've not tested this as all my animals are out in the open but it is true they will die if they have no light for a long period of time. having them outside where they get sunlight every day is enough to keep them alive. they will not die over night but prolong lack of light will kill them eventually.

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14 hours ago, James Cichocki said:

I've also been feeding my 4 rams and 4 ewes grass and they don't mate or get pregnant

I feed all my pigs and bighorns dry grass all winter and they still reproduce. so I don't know what's not working but I can say with confidence that it doesn't matter what you feed them at least in the sense that they will or will not mate. if better food last longer or encourages mating faster I don't know but I do know it doesn't stop them from mating if you feed them only grass.

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3 hours ago, James Cichocki said:

I tried some grain and for some reason they got pregnant right after that, weird.

yeah very weird, I only feed mine grass all winter and they still reproduce even in cold temperatures.

it has only gotten down to about -17 though so maybe that's not too cold.

glad you got them producing for you. too bad couldn't really figure out what was going on at first but the good news is it's working now so that's great.

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  • 3 months later...

Females should display "Portions eaten: " in their tooltip when they have eaten from a trough at least once. They must eat 10 portions to be able to get pregnant. They will never breed if they are not fed from troughs.

Males will also eat from troughs, but they do not show portions eaten and do not have a minimum requirement.

Despite this, do not confine males away from filled troughs that they want to get at. It'll cause animals glitching through fences, and not always in the place or direction you expect.

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7 minutes ago, Streetwind said:

Females should display "Portions eaten: " in their tooltip when they have eaten from a trough at least once. They must eat 10 portions to be able to get pregnant. They will never breed if they are not fed from troughs.

Males will also eat from troughs, but they do not show portions eaten and do not have a minimum requirement.

Despite this, do not confine males away from filled troughs that they want to get at. It'll cause animals glitching through fences, and not always in the place or direction you expect.

OMG: that is how I am supposed to understand it.
they have to eat 10 portions. Thanks a lot :D!

thing is jsut that the wiki says one thing and the game says differnet, why couldnt they just sya "potions eaten" instead of 
 satiety? that confuses folk. :I

Edited by Pernille Rasmussen
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